Ladies n Gents
home fast forward interviews like editorial think fashion curator work in progress contact
 

JOSHUA HARKER interview

 
0 comments
Posted on Dec 27 2013
ladiesngents
ladiesngents
ladiesngents


You are a pioneer in 3D printed art and sculpture.
Would you describe the process of creating your first 3D printed piece?

I had done these surrealism drawings using a practice called automatism since the late 80s. As a sculptor I was driven to realize them 3-dimensionally but traditional mediums could not produce them in the manner they needed to be created or in the forms they wanted to be. So it was actually about a 20 year process of continual searching & experimenting which ultimately led me to 3d printing technology & digital modeling. I started working with it in the very early 90s. It was evident that this was something that held the possibilities I was looking for but it was nowhere near ready for what I wanted to do with it. It wasn't until a perfect storm in early 2000s that the technology, materials, & software had all matured to a point where they could be used to produce my visions.



ladiesngents

ladiesngents


What were the challenges you had to face and how did it feel when you first saw what you had created?
Having to pioneer an entirely new medium is a challenge I never would have imagined I would be faced with. To have seen that journey through & to be the 1st to create something that could technically never have existed before is a profound position to be presented with. I felt that I had truly accomplished something & as an artist felt my vision had been liberated. I'm lucky to be alive in this era.



ladiesngents
ladiesngents
ladiesngents


Do you believe it is important that viewers of your art have a good grasp of how technology evolves,
so that they fully appreciate your work?

 It helps but it shouldn't be necessary. I believe my art should stand on it's own separate of the medium. Understanding the impossibilities of my work outside of the medium does bring a much better appreciation of what's been accomplished but again, I think the art should speak for itself.

 In general, do you have expectations from the viewers? I don't know if I specifically expect anything from viewers but I do purposefully strive to strike a sense of wonder & fascination. If anything, an expectation from my end would be that they've seen it all before. That drives me to reinterpret how we look at shapes & form. To do things that haven't been done or seen before or to change how you look at something you're familiar with.



ladiesngents
ladiesngents


In order to create your “Quixotic Divinity Headdress” did you have to do much research into ancient traditions?
Is research a big part of the artistic process?

 I did a fair amount but it certainly wasn't academic. Really just trying to get a feel for the aesthetics of traditional adornment as a source of inspiration. When I'm doing anything representational I do like to research my subject matter. Again, mostly as a source of inspiration. The bigger part of the process for me is actually getting out of the way & letting myself do something as honestly as possible. I don't want to over think my work... I want to let it happen.



ladiesngents

ladiesngents


By the way, why did you call this headdress “Quixotic”?
The word is a reference to Don Quixote. I used it as an homage to the imaginative spirit.



ladiesngents


Which factors have, so far, been decisive as to defining your aesthetic sensibilities?

This exploration of what I call the architecture of the imagination is key in what I do. My surrealist automatism approach to sculpture has it's own natural occurring aesthetic from my subconscious. Having been able to create from that realm & study it, I recognize it as being connected to dividing patterns & the organic mathematics that control forms & flow in nature. There is certainly some pop sensibility in there as well.



ladiesngents
ladiesngents


How do you imagine that fashion will evolve in the future?
 In the big picture it's hard to predict fashion given that it evolves from unpredictable influences. Regarding the use of 3d printing technology,liberation of geometry is key & has already shown influence. I see haute couture becoming increasingly accessible... personalized/custom fitted everything will become the norm. I very much expect there to be significant development of 3d printed textiles so that will play a major role as well.



ladiesngents
ladiesngents
ladiesngents


In your opinion, in what way will 3D printing revolutionize our lives?
So many ways that it's difficult to summarize outside of an hour long conversation. Besides the groundbreaking applications in medicine (homo evolutis), I believe it has the potential to make us more independent & to free us from this provider/consumer product grid. We can participate more directly in how things are created & used. It has potential to spur an entirely new cottage industry manufacturing market & economic niche.
Potential to localize commerce. Potential to empower, liberate, & innovate... potential, potential, potential. It's up to us to make use of it in a productive & responsible way rather than building guns, drones, & garbage... it's all about vision.




ladiesngents
ladiesngents


Do you still like to draw, paint and sculpt the "old fashioned" way?
Absolutely, I love the tangible. The digital & 3d printed medium are simply another tool for me to use. In a lot of ways I only use it because I have to... there's no other way to realize much of my work. I am increasingly bridging my use of these new tools & technology with the the "old fashioned". One thing I really pursue in my art is new ways of understanding & creating form, so being able to combine my efforts with various mediums to realize that is wonderful. All this technology & digital stuff is just the current addendum to the history of art & one day will be considered "old fashioned" as well.



ladiesngents


joshharker.com



back

LEAVE YOUR COMMENT:
 
   
 
   
   
 
 
Follow Me on Pinterest