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DZHUS_Creative with a conscience_Interview  
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Posted on Dec 4 2015
DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda

DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda



DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




Looking back to your childhood, which experiences were that provoked your love for fashion?
In my early years, I was keen on creating different kinds of art, but when I was five I clearly realised I wanted to design clothes. My favourite activity was exploring my granny's vintage magazines and making my own fashion sketches. To improve my skills, I went to a children's professional art school, where well-known Ukrainian artists became my teachers. Despite coming from a non-artistic family, I was surrounded with that amazing creative atmosphere during my school years and since then, for me there already was no way back to the normal way of living. However, for me fine art still remained just a tool for bringing my fashion concepts to life. It's hard to recall a particular reason of my passion for design, but I could never imagine my life without it.





DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




You state that each piece of DZHUS carries a distinctive ideological message. Why is that?
 All things I get inspired with, be it ancient iconography or industrial uniform, have another, deeper meaning besides of their obvious visual peculiarity. These objects embody certain  social, psychological aspects that balance on the edge of mental and spiritual perception. Their controversial ethos helps push the boundaries of conscience. The other and probably even more  important message I want to deliver with my designs is the necessity of being humane and future-oriented in the modern reality. By producing sustainable and cruelty-free fashion products and communicating them to intelligent, independently-thinking audience I aspire to prove that it is possible to look edgy and avant-garde, yet remain in peace and harmony with the universe.





DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




Would you describe the main characteristics and the philosophy behind your Spring/Summer 2016 Collection?
 The collection named "Pro Forma" is inspired with uniform design, with its priority of functionality and standardisation over subjective aesthetics.

In my alternative cut concepts, I played up the recognisable structural features of the medical, training and workers' wear. In these eclectic, exaggeratedly normcore designs, I used DZHUS' signature industrial-inspired finishing, such as fastening with strings, raw hems and exposed overstitching. Seam allowances are also exposed on the right side and piped with bias binding that turns into straps, extending past the edge of the fabric. Elastic gathers replaced traditional tucks. Overlock is also used as a constructional technique for a special fabric and a fringe. The ivory-grey and black pieces are made of hand treated bleached linen and textured cotton.





DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




When designing a new collection, what is your driving force - is it an inspiration or is it an inner need to express yourself and make a statement?

 I always feel like there's an objective need for me to bring my innovative concepts to life, - a mission, if you want, - otherwise they would remain just a fantasy, whereas they deserve to be introduced to the world and to have their own independent existence and relations with people who understand and value them.For me, creative inspiration is a permanent state of mind, so I don't have to do anything special to get new ideas. This doesn't mean I always have a desire to work, though. However, regardless of being tired or demotivated, I continue developing new concepts, because I just cannot forbid them to live.





DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




Your designs are characterized by a beautiful geometry.
Where does this stem from? Is it something that pervades your life, too?

 In my country, Ukraine, there are many buildings, monuments and factory zones left from the era of USSR. Solemn or utilitarian, this authentic architecture is always very austere and industrial-inspired. Most people consider it ugly and dreary, as it reminds them of the bygone regime. As for me, I've always admired the aesthetical aspect of the Soviet urban tradition: strict lines and monolithic shapes, the cult of concrete and the stern spirit. This special environment and my ability to comprehend it from an independent, artistic point of view have influenced the style of my designs essentially.





DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




Is there anything about the fashion industry that you are not fond of?
 I don't like the crazy rhythm of the industry, as well as the necessity to follow the rules of the global fashion business. Even though I work in the avant-garde niche, I still have to do networking and PR, marketing and sales, adjust my personal life to the fashion seasons etc. - just because I want my designs to be worn. In the event, my everyday reality has very little in common with that indie and bohemian life, suited to an infantile nonconformist like me.





DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda




DZHUS - ladiesngents-Olga Nepravda



P h o t o   O l g a  N e p r a v d a
S t y l e   I r i n a  D z h u s
M a k e u p  &  h a i r   M a r i a  K o l o m i e t s
M o d e l   A n a s t a s i a  N e p r a v d a



www.irinadzhus.com




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Atsushi Nakashima_Bring on the future_Interview  
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Posted on Nov 10 2015
Atsushi Nakashima - ladiesngents-Atsushi Nakashim interview

Atsushi Nakashima - ladiesngents-Atsushi Nakashim interview


Atsushi Nakashima - ladiesngents-Atsushi Nakashim interview




Atsushi Nakashima - ladiesngents-Atsushi Nakashim interview




Can you recall certain influences during your childhood years that provoked your interest in fashion?
My grandfather was a painter so I have always liked painting and drawing. Regarding fashion, it clearly when I was at high school that I became interested in it.





Atsushi Nakashima - ladiesngents-Atsushi Nakashim interview




Atsushi Nakashima - ladiesngents-Atsushi Nakashim interview




Between 2012, when you first became professionally involved in fashion, until this day, it looks like the mood of your fashion collections has changed. Would you elaborate on this evolution?
I think that the evolution is due to the change of the city where I live. In 2012 I was just returning from Paris and my style was more "European". Now I have been living in Tokyo for three years; it has influenced my style, which has become more a mix of European and Japanese.





Atsushi Nakashima - ladiesngents-Atsushi Nakashim interview




Atsushi Nakashima - ladiesngents-Atsushi Nakashim interview




Atsushi Nakashima - ladiesngents-Atsushi Nakashim interview




Atsushi Nakashima - ladiesngents-Atsushi Nakashima  interview




When designing a new collection, what is your driving force - is it inspiration or is it
an inner need to express yourself and make a statement?

I simply love designing, I always need to create new things. My main theme never changes: an association of classic and modern elements with a futuristic atmosphere. Often, I first choose the colours of the new collection and develop the designs from them.





Atsushi Nakashima - ladiesngents-Atsushi Nakashima  interview




Atsushi Nakashima - ladiesngents-Atsushi Nakashima  interview




Atsushi Nakashima - ladiesngents-Atsushi Nakashima  interview




You have worked in Paris and now in Tokyo.
What are the differences you see as a professional between these two capitals?

In Paris, fashion has a long history and the designers respect it. There is a strong base and the design is build from this base. This is something I learnt from Jean Paul Gaultier. In Japan, fashion history is very recent, so there is no base on designing, the designer can create the most incredible garments.
There is no limits. I like both cultures and try to mix them.





Atsushi Nakashima - ladiesngents-Atsushi Nakashima  interview




Atsushi Nakashima - ladiesngents-Atsushi Nakashima  interview




Atsushi Nakashima - ladiesngents-Atsushi Nakashima  interview




Atsushi Nakashima - ladiesngents-Atsushi Nakashima  interview




Would you talk to us about the philosophy and the workings behind your collection for Spring /Summer 2016?
First I decided to make a minimal style collection, based on black and white. While designing, I had the idea to add red, and then khaki. I have been inspired by Stanley Kubrick's "2001: A Space Odyssey". Future is one of my main inspiration and I liked the colors of the movie. I also used high techs fabrics like "ultra suede" (faux suede), mixed with jacquard fabric that a Japanese craftsman made by hand.





Atsushi Nakashima - ladiesngents-Atsushi Nakashima  interview




Atsushi Nakashima - ladiesngents-Atsushi Nakashima  interview




http://www.atsushinakashima.com/




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Nafsika Skourti_Activism in Fashion_Interview  
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Posted on Nov 5 2015


Nafsika Skourti-ladiesngents-Nafsika Skourti interview

Nafsika Skourti-ladiesngents-Nafsika Skourti interview




Nafsika Skourti-ladiesngents-Nafsika Skourti interview




Your collection for Spring/Summer 2016, under the name “Temporary Security”,
came  as what you called a “fashionable protest”. A protest against what?

A protest against passive behaviour. I was inspired by action. That urgent feeling to act. Living in Jordan, we are surrounded by so much conflict and unjustifiable wars.
I feel we are fighting the wrong wars, for the wrong reasons. All conflict is essentially a power struggle, for land, control, and resources. I wish we were fighting for true freedom, and working harder to see what unifies us.





Nafsika Skourti-ladiesngents-Nafsika Skourti interview




Nafsika Skourti-ladiesngents-Nafsika Skourti interview




You have talked about the concept of  "Beautiful activism”. Would you elaborate?
One of the collections starting points was the classic camouflage print, which I took and saturated with colour: Military made beautiful. I was also thinking about the 'new activism' which is essentially whatever you share on facebook. We made black jeans that said 'the borders' on the front, and 'television' on the back - a subtle commentary on my newsfeed where I have posts about refugees being washed up on the shore sandwiched between Adele’s new song and clip of a dog and kitten who nap together.





Nafsika Skourti-ladiesngents-Nafsika Skourti interview




You have trained in Haute Couture. Would you tell us how important this experience has been for you?
Also, do you think there is a place for haute couture in our days?

Of course there is. There will always be a market for people who want something extra special, and now haute couture has become a tool for marketing brands' ready to wear collections. One way that haute couture has influenced my work is my attitude towards design - I always start by asking 'how do I add value?'. During my training at Ecole Lesage we started with a piece of fabric, and then 150 hours later, it became magic because of the embroidery.
It taught me patience, and that putting focused, inspired energy will always produce a result.





Nafsika Skourti-ladiesngents-Nafsika Skourti interview




If you could change one thing about the fashion industry, what would that be?
I dont understand why so much effort is being put to resuscitate old fashion houses. Cristobal Balenciaga is a genius, but he’s gone now. Why did we have a modern day genius - Nicolas Ghesquiere work under his name? There is too much confidence in the legacy -the name- of past masters and not enough belief and investment in the new ones. Maybe it’s radical to ask that a design house only lasts the lifetime of its designer, because the only reason brands like McQueen, Nina Ricci, Thierry Mugler are continuing is because of the financial backers and investors, and I don’t know how healthy it is for so many houses to be fuelled by finance. Or worse, fragrance.





Nafsika Skourti-ladiesngents-Nafsika Skourti interview



http://www.nafsikaskourti.com/


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Yusuke Kagari_The Bag Gentleman_Interview  
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Posted on Oct 16 2015
Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents

Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents


Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents




What got you interested in doing accessories?
There was no special reason as to why I started making bags. I guess because my father is an artist, so It was natural for me to think about making things for a living.




Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents




Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents




When you started working, which were your influences?
I like to take pictures of walls I find interesting. I have been taking pictures since before I started making bags. When I was thinking “what kind of original design can I make?”  I looked at my photos and decided to make bags with the same kind of atmosphere. Also around 2005, when I started my brand, unique products were trendy in Japan. There were a lot of teams organizing design events which were like  the Milan salons in Europe. I was really influenced by the things I saw there. The way of thinking about product design is very interesting. There are many people making unique products, but I was especially influenced by Gijs Bakker and his brand “droog”. Their projects were amazing from the 90s—late 00s. Lately Gijs left droog and the style has changed, so it might not be as much of an influence anymore…ha ha. Also my father, Seiji Kagari, who is a Japanese paper artist has been an influence as to my way of life
.





Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents




Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents




Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents




Why do you want your pieces to be hand made?
I think it’s the best way to make unusual products in a small space with efficiency.





Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents




Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents




Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents




You draw inspiration from old architecture - would you elaborate?
Which architectural styles do you find most interesting?

It’s very hard to answer this question in a succinct way. I get different kind of images through watching walls and architecture and cities. Then I put the images or atmosphere into my creative work. It’s not something I can explain in words. If I could, I think I wouldn't need to create my products.
I don’t care so much about the history of architecture -like architectural styles, periods or techniques. Basically I like walking around and looking at cities. I probably like cities more than human beings. For me, a city is like an interesting creature.





Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents




Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents




Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents




Are the accessories you create the result of a lot of experimenting or
did you know what you wanted to create right from the start?

It is a process of both. I had images of designs I wanted to make, but initially I didn’t have enough technique and experience to create the images in my head. I couldn’t make the things I wanted to see. My hands couldn’t quite keep up with my brain. Lately, I feel like I'm getting closer to being able to create the ideas in my head.





Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents
Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents




Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents




Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents




Why is white so important to you?
White was not especially important for me. To be honest, I was quite poor when I started my brand and I didn’t have enough money to buy a lot of materials. I had to choose one colour for my designs. My final decision was that I needed to choose between two colours. I decided on a grey like concrete, and a white like mortar. I could have chosen both but I chose white. Probably because walls are white.  Also, I like white cubes in galleries and I like renovation with DIY that uses a lot of whitewash. It could be another reason why I chose white. White wasn’t initially important for me, but now I think It was the right decision, because white is a starting colour that deteriorates over time. It’s almost like zero. Everything starts from white.





Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents




Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents




Yusuke Kagari-ladiesngents



yusukekagari.com




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