Ladies n Gents
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NARITAKA SATOH interview  
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Posted on Feb 12 2014
ladies n gents

Temptation, acrylic, charcoal, pencil on paper, 91x116.7cm



ladies n gebts

ladies n gents

Mantoy no.6, acrilic paint, charcoal, pencil on paper, 41x31.8x1.7cm


ladies n gents

Mantoy no.5, acrilic paint, charcoal, pencil on paper, 41x31.8x1.7cm



What is it about the human form that you wish you could transform?
By experimenting with the possible appearance of the human body, I am trying to create a kind of artificial beauty. In essense, what really excites me about the human form are all those emotions that are expressed on the surface of the body - these I would like to eventually make tangible.



ladies n gents

Dream Vision #1, pencil on paper


ladies n gents

Dream Vision #3, pencil on paper



Why do you choose to use pencil? What is it about pencil that makes it ideal for you to work with?
I wish to create objects by integrating single lines drawn by pencil, because it is so expressive. On top of that, it allows me to have full control of everything.




ladies n gents

Pleasure on a palm, acrylic paint, charcoal, pencil on paper, 162x97cm


ladies n gents

Distorted Smile, pencil on paper, 91x116.7x5cm



Can you recall the first ever work of art that provoked your interest and sparked your imagination?          
I don’t have one work to name, but if I do have to recall something, it would be the colour flat spaces (colour planes) by Francis Bacon.




ladies n gents

Naked Woman, painting, pencil, charcoal, acrylic on paper, panel, 41x31.8



When starting to work on a new piece, what is usually the motivation? Is it an inspiration or rather the need to create?
Everything stems from the relentless education my mother gave me, from the abuses my classmates put me through, or from situations where somebody else was abused; so it all comes down to my childhood experiences.




ladies n gents

Black Shadow, acrylic paint, charcoal, pencil on paper, 65.2x91cm


ladies n gents

Mantoy No.2, drawing, acrylic paint, charcoal, pencil on paper with acrylic gloss, 41x31.8


ladies n gents

Who stands right behind you now 2, drawing, pencil on paper with acrylic gloss, 130.3x89.4



Looking at three of your works (Who stands right behind you now 2,  Black Shadow, Mantoy No.2 ) I was wondering, what is it about rabbits and toy pets that inspires to create these interestingly twisted, dark images?
Why do humans always smile? What is that smile? I have indefinite feelings about that definitive smile.




ladies n gents

Dream Vision #26, pencil on paper



How important a part does fashion feature in your everyday life?
I am not interested in the values of “cool” or “not cool”, “fashionable” or “not fashionable”. If there is an important aspect in fashion it would be its ability to cover the surface and deceive other people by hiding the essence of a human.




frantic.jp/en/



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ANDREAS ENGLUND interview  
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Posted on Jan 26 2014
ladies n gents
ladies n gents
ladies n gents



What was the motivation for creating your super hero? Was it a sudden inspiration, or was it maybe connected to an inner need to express something more personal through this character?
My visual inspiration originates from my fascination of the human body and greek sculpture. Conceptually I get inspired when I’m forced to rethink and see things in new perspectives. Old greek sculpture for me, is like the main print of the classic Superhero – but without the dress. Heroes in general are all stereotypical – they are perfect people. In this case I wanted to question that stereotype. So I put a dress on this old greek sculpture and then pictured him in alternative situations that portray his human side. Also by modelling him as the character he shares a lot with me and maybe I would be a lot like him if I turned out to be a Superhero one day... Some things are a bit exaggerated, but the essence of me is there. I can see my own flaws and also laugh about my own shortcomings. I guess I did feel the need to also express something more personal and by doing so behind this costume, I felt safe and not exposed.




ladies n gents
ladies n gents

What does the fact that this super hero grows old symbolise?
Why did you want to make a super hero grow old and thus weaker?

I thing aging has made me aware of how you change as a person over time when it comes to your priorities in life. When you get married or become a father for example. When your parents get older and more fragile. You realise that life is not eternal and that you cannot take it for granted.




ladies n gents
ladies n gents



Why do you choose to use very large canvases?
I simply love size. I think in this case the communication grows with the size. The seriousness as well.




ladies n gents
ladies n gents
ladies n gents

When drawing and painting, what are you usually thinking?
Are you always concentrated on painting or do you allow your mind to drift?

When I’m painting im very focused at the actual process. The colours, the shades etc. But the motif is already sketched so it’s a kind of pleasant concentration where my mind can easily drift. I usually listen to documentaries on the radio or audio books. I think it’s great. It shows that we men (sometimes) actually can do two things at the same time.




ladies n gents
ladies n gents

In case you happen to be in a bad mood, does this maybe ever influence the “plot” or “storyline” of a painting ?
Well, I guess it does when I’m in the early stages of an idea. When I’m working with the ideas I do play them in my head so if it’s a tragic scene I feel tragic and that affects the way it’s conceived. Then when I’m painting I’m usually in another more concentrated mood that is quite neutral so I very seldom change the original idea in the actual painting process.




ladies n gents

The fact that you show the super hero’s weaknesses and fragility, make him all the more attractive and sexy. Were you aware that this would be so?
Did you consciously make the choice to show his weaknesses so as to make him more attractive?

That’s an interesting observation. To be honest I haven’t thought of him that way actually.
I guess when I see myself behind that mask that kind of observation is lost to me.




ladies n gents
ladies n gents

Humour is an integral part of your super hero series of paintings. Why is humour important to you?
I guess for me it has to do with how I want to look at life and all the fears it holds. We all experience difficulties in life (being old is one of them) and if I can, I try to stay positive about it. That gives me energy and I want my paintings to give that kind of positive energy as well by portraying these scenes twinkly-eyed. Humour for me carries messages that otherwise would be hard to convey. It liberates my thoughts and ideas from pretentiousness while at the same time it opens doors to new routes and angles. Humour also connects people all around the world. You cannot choose what happens to you in life, but you can choose how to react to it. For me that is the key to being happy.




ladies n gents

Is there a specific story that you make up for each painting? For example, what is the story behind “Flying” which is a favourite of ours here at l&g?

This person is extreme. He’s someone who you might even have dreamed about being when you were a kid. Someone who has it all. By putting him in everyday situations I try to show that despite being powerful through wealth, strength or intelligence, we still share the same kind of ordinary problems. To connect with this character to me is to recognise myself in his different situations and also the way he reacts to them. If he always would have been unafraid, never tired, never bored, always satisfied etc. he would feel inhuman and alien to me. I get inspired when I have to rethink or see things in new perspectives. To see that there is always an alternative way to the mainstream and I hope to communicate that inspiration through my paintings. I think I got the idea about ”Flying” when I remembered the classic sentence from the first superman movie. ”It’s a Bird...It’s a Plane...It’s Superman” I mean if someone thinks you’re a bird flying around maybe you also feel like a bird – letting go whenever you feel for it. I also thought that if you were in a bad mood you just wouldn’t care in that kind of situation. If you got to go and there’s no time well... why not?




ladies n gents
ladies n gents

andreasenglund.com



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Interview with HOPE  
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Posted on Dec 5 2013
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ladiesngents
ladiesngents

Installation view at Kunsthalle Athena, 2010, Courtesy The Breeder, Athens Monte Carlo



Why do you choose to appear masked in public?  Is your personal identity somehow threatening  to your artistic one?
I free myself when wearing a mask. I see it as a perceptual experience that has been externalized.




A vocabulary for the consolation of flesh 2011 Still from performance photo by Panos Mixail
Courtesy the artist and The Breeder Athens Monte Carlo


ladiesngents
ladiesngents

Time will not give me time, installation view at REMAP 2011, Athens Courtesy The Breeder, Athens Monte Carlo




In many of your collages, it seems as if you have masked cultural icons and sculptures.
What are the issues that you wish to explore through these pieces?

They are like distorted television images.
 Mainly, they are a provision for conversation on different topics and the sharing of  information, based on the presented objects from which the visual sculptures are built.




Untitled, 2012, laser print collage, dimensions variable

ladiesngents
ladiesngents

NOTEMPLE installation view of work by Tobias Bernstrup, The Breeder Athens 2013, photo Maria Galvan




You have often talked about the anti conformism in your street art.
With your recent show at The Breeder gallery, “NoTemple”, did you intend to create or destroy?

I ‘d say that I wanted to create contexts of meaning that work in everyday usage as well as in relation to starting a public
dialogue based on analysis and visual investigation.




Untitled 2012, laser print collage, dimensions variable

ladiesngents


Why do you specifically choose ancient elements and talk about the destruction of the temple?
What is the importance of human history in your art practice?

Ancient images generate ambivalence owing to the conditions in which they were produced. That’s why I use them. The destruction of the temple implies the destruction of Art. Something new should be invented. We have created a temple (art) that we have no idea what it represents. I feel like we are in war and we are shooting the enemies without knowing why we do it and who are the ones we are shooting at. A quest to blind art.



ladiesngents

RIP, 2011, still from performance, costumes by Digitaria, photo Yiorgos Mavropoulos Courtesy the artist and The Breeder Athens Monte Carlo


You have recently collaborated with Digitaria. Are you drawn to fashion as an opportunity for performance?
For me just the fact that I am being involved with fashion is a performance by itself, because I’ ve always kept a distance from what is fashionable.  So I thought it was quite extreme when I was called to curate a fashion show. The first show I curated for Digitaria was at KUNSTHALLE ATHENA and when I explained to her the idea I had of nailing the models inside cocoons hidden in the rooms of the buildings, I couldn’t really believe that  Digitaria (Eleftheria Arapoglou) would be so positive. The show was really great and we had a proposal from Vassilis Zidianakis (ATOPOS) to take part to “ARRRGH! Monsters in fashion” exhibition. Later on I curated 2 more shows for Digitaria that were also based on a performance. Fashion can be very interesting if people are willing to be playful and naïve.




Untitled, 2011 site specific installation at The Breeder booth at Frieze Art Fair in London

ladiesngents
ladiesngents

Installation view at Kunsthalle Athena, 2010 Courtesy The Breeder, Athens Monte Carlo




If I asked you to describe your artistic practice, what would you say?
It’s a process of seeking and revealing a visual ambiguity. A practice of implicating the viewer into resolving a dilemma.


ladiesngents
Untitled, 2012, laser print collage, dimensions variable


thebreedersystem.com



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ANDREA HASLER Interview  
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Posted on Sep 24 2013





How do you make your wax sculptures and is it a time consuming process?
After years of searching for the ultimate malleable material, I felt relieved to have finally found ‘my’ material the first time I worked with wax half way through Art College.  For me, all the other sculpting materials feel limiting in terms of process and wax allows for flexibility: there is never an end-point, a piece can ‘rest’ for months before I warm it up to work on it again. Years later and I still greatly enjoy the ritual element of melting wax now deeply embedded in my sculptural practice. I enjoy the slow process, literally building up layer after layer.
Saying that, there are also limitations as wax is not suitable for outdoor sculptures. I am working on a commission to cast one of my large wax pieces in bronze.







Where do you find inspiration for the shapes and detailing on your wax accessories?

I spend a lot of time in medical libraries, as I have always been very fascinated by Anatomical wax models to illustrate various medical conditions. In the 1800s moulages (waxes showing injuries or pathological change in the body) often formed part of travelling shows across Europe; part entertainment, part public health education!






Which organs feature most in your bag and accessory designs?
The bags and accessories are not modeled with a single organ in mind more a combination of ‘organ-intestine-brain-liposuction-waste’ all in one!








Can you tell us a bit more about your installation ‘Burdens of Excess’ which is on show at GUSFORD | los angeles?
When GUSFORD | los angeles invited me to exhibit a Solo Show in West Hollywood, I felt it very fitting to show Burdens of Excess which is an installation that resulted out of my long term project Desire as its subject resonates with so much it stands for and I was intrigued by the viewers reactions.
In a paradox way, like bringing the deconstructed intestine bags back to their boutique environment and closing the circle, I feel the notion of this show has been brought back to its ‘natural habitat’; as in Hollywood.
In Burdens of Excess I play with the aesthetic codes of a chic, seductive luxury boutique with its black walls, glittery flooring and the way the organ objects are presented on plinths, hermetically sealed behind glass boxes.
The subject matters of both the desire for luxury items as well as the darker side of plastic surgery’s intestine-liposuction filled accessories are both synonym with what Hollywood glamour
represents for me in order to be accepted, to be part of the ‘tribe’.






How has your Swiss heritage affected your view of the world?
Growing up in Switzerland, famous for its understated take on ‘anything’.
I was not prepared for the brashness and logo obsession in relation to luxury goods, that I encountered when moving to London. Long limited edition waiting lists and queuing around the block for a pair of shoes where all new to me. So initially, Desire started by analysing my own growing obsession with luxury items and developed from there. Through this, I became fascinated with the psychological aspect of consumerism and its emotional link to ‘Abject’. I am intrigued by the borderline between attraction and repulsion, something that is aesthetically desirable yet revolting at the same time and were viewer’s attraction are replaced by repulsion, power, control and impotence.
In my work, I have always been particularly drawn to the body, how to depict the emotional body and working with skin as the physical element that divides the Self from the other, as well as the potential container for both and what happens if you open up those boundaries.
All of this forms part of Burdens of Excess, where I play with visions of the future, scenes of surgical fetishes and glamour and unsettle the viewer with images of carefully staged
and naturalistic wax reproduction of human organs in form of luxury fetish.






You have some pretty extreme views of what luxury will mean in the future - can you tell us a bit more?
Luxury is an excess that holds a great fascination for me. My work poses new questions in relation to the craze for luxury and status: How much can our body take? - Will we sacrifice everything for beauty? - What kind of person do we wish to be tomorrow? - How much money will we spend on it? I honestly think that one day, it will not be the Rolex on your wrist that will be the ultimate luxury accessory but kidneys embellished with diamonds. As soon as the exterior has been completely molded, plastic surgery of an internal organ is its logical consequence.
This is the peak of the exclusive: The intervention is not visible - or only so on x-rays!
I think we live in a nomadic society and the brands we choose are a reflection of the ‘tribe’ we want to belong to. More importantly they help us being identified by other nomads, to become part of the group. This notion is driven by a sense of desperately wanting to belong that the philosopher Julia Kristeva links with our desire to recreate the symbiotic mother-infant relationship and which stems from the consequent tragedy of the sense of loss when one realizes that they are an independent subject. So really, to put it simple: I think the craze for luxury is a longing for one’s nurturing mother!



andreahasler.com

gusfordgallery.com



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