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Alana Dee Haynes_Lifeís Patterns_Interview  
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Posted on May 7 2017
Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview

Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview






Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview







Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview







Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview






How old were you when you started having an actual interest in art and how did you express that?
Growing up, I was given tons of art supplies by my family. I had everything from a glue stick to a nail gun. It was great!







Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview







Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview







Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview






Did you experiment a lot before reaching the point in your work at which you are now?
I experimented with different mediums as I got older but my core love of patterns has always shown through. I have done sculptures, painting, photography, printmaking, and more- but the patterns I draw are something that I do all the time. Something that just comes out of me. And I think its important to embrace that.







Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview







Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview







Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview






While creating an artwork, what usually goes through your mind? Does working ever function as a kind of therapy?
Always. I've always felt like its a form of meditation. I get very close to the photograph Iím drawing on and create these circles or lines that are very small.
Its a repetitive motion for my hand and my mind is just following the shades of color and form of the image and it becomes intuitive as to what should happen next.
I try not to think about my own self too much while working and just listen to music and think about the image in front of me.







Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview






Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview






Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview






Is it different for you when you work on one of your own photos
as opposed to when you work on somebody elseís photos?

Yes. If I'm working on one of my own photos, I get very in my head and self conscious. I worry about what the person Iím drawing on will think and how to make them look best- usually because I love them in some way. When I draw on a photographerís photo I have no context to the image besides what I'm seeing.
My imagination can run wild and my hand can just make things happen.







Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview







Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview







Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview






What do you like most and what do you dislike most about contemporary art?
I like to see things I've never thought of before. I feel like contemporary art has no limits with all the new mediums we have. It keeps getting more complex and more simplified at the same time. For myself, I don't like when I feel I have to justify my art with a deep meaning just because itís new.







Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview






Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview







Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview







Have you ever experimented with your personal look?
I've cut off most of my hair, then when it grew back I died it blond. This past year is the first time in a while I've had my natural hair - crazy curly and dark brown. I think its more of an adjustment to just keep myself natural and accept the frizz.








Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview







Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview







Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview






Is there a garment or an outfit that, at some point or event in your life, has played a distinctive role?
I wore my mothers combat boots that she wore while pregnant with me. I wore the hell out of them until they had giant holes in both sides and were falling apart.
My family would beg me to let them buy me shoes but I didnít want them to. I can't really remember why I was so attached, but somehow I felt that they defined me. Maybe it was because people wanted me to take them off.







Alana Dee Haynes - ladiesngents - Alana Dee Haynes interview



alanadeehaynes.com






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Richard Starbuck_Making art is personal_Interview  
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Posted on Jan 5 2017
Richard Starbuck-ladiesngents


Richard Starbuck-ladiesngents









Richard Starbuck-ladiesngents





 At  what age did you start having an interest in art, as an expressive means?
 Well I didnít have a great time at school as I was severely dyslexic and would often skip it, by the age of 10 I found that the only thing I was good at was art.
Over time that naturally became my main focus and I knew from an early age thatís what I wanted to do.
I actually quit school in the end and was home tutored, all my art lessons were one to one, my own mentor in a way. In my early 20ís I applied to C & G London School of Art and did my BA and Masters in Fine Art there, and I have been making work ever since.






Richard Starbuck-ladiesngents







Richard Starbuck-ladiesngents






You have said that you are fascinated by various underground belief systems.
What is it about them that you find intriguing and how do they inspire your work?

The stories, itís all about the stories and the people behind them. Who are these people? Do they really believe what they are saying is true?
I think most of them generally believe what they see or what they have read is to be true, and I find that fascinating. Itís not so much that I believe in these conspiracies, itís more the social and psychological systems of belief which underpin them. I think Iím slightly obsessed with the subject to be honest,
Iím constantly watching videos on UFOs and conspiracy theories, and once I entered down that rabbit hole I couldnít find my way out again.

Over the years I have found that these belief systems are a never ending loop of paranoia and fear.
It can be quite sinister and toxic, so itís best to keep it at armís length. My more recent work is a lighter hearted take on the UFO phenomena, using book cover art from the 50s and 60s. I feel these where more innocent times and were the peak of UFO sightings.
The UFO thing is something Iím always coming back to in my work, itís my anchor so to speak. Itís the launch pad from which I start to paint.







Richard Starbuck interview-ladiesngents






Richard Starbuck interview-ladiesngents






Do you think that contemporary art really expresses or speaks for our times? In what way?
Looking back at history, yes art can express and speak for our time. Art reflects our culture, our mood, our political systems at that time, but only by looking back over time it becomes clearer and easier to articulate. It will be interesting to see what the future says about our time, it feels like a strange world at the moment.
The art world feels more complex, it feels like there are billions of artists out there and they are all looking at each other, comparing each otherís work instead of looking within themselves. You can easily drown in the sea of social media if you are not careful.







Richard Starbuck interview-ladiesngents







Richard Starbuck-ladiesngents






When starting work, is it an inspiration that you follow or rather an inner need to express something of yourself?
For me making work is a personal thing, I do it selfishly for myself. As I know that if I didnít make art I wouldnít feel like me, I wouldnít be happy. Itís a need thatís hard to explain, but the first feeling is to make, and the rest follows.







Richard Starbuck interview-ladiesngents






In what way does living in an era of ďpost-truthĒ affects the work of artists?
I canít speak for all artists, I can only speak for myself but I do feel we are living in an increasingly strange and confusing world, where hubris and "double-speak" rule the roost. When the 'truth' is indistinguishable from a lie.







Richard Starbuck interview-ladiesngents






Is there something in the art world that you could change given the chance?
Diversity would be a good start, I would like to see artists from more varied backgrounds. The art world is quite elitist and I only feel like itís getting
worse with tuition fees and high studio rents.

 





Richard Starbuck interview-ladiesngents






How important is fashion and a sense of style in your everyday life?
My style is quite minimal, I wear the same 5 shirts (not at the same time). I know what I like and stick to it until holes appear.







Richard Starbuck interview-ladiesngents






Richard Starbuck interview-ladiesngents




richardstarbuck.com





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Namsa Leuba_Explorer of the Spiritual_Interview  
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Posted on Oct 18 2015

Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents

Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents





Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents

For WAD magazine nį 53 / Cocktail
Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents
For WAD magazine nį 53 / Cocktail



How old were you when you first started having an interest in photography, as art?
At the time, what was it that you liked to take photographs of?

In 2004, I studied Design of Information in the Art School of La Chaux-de-Fonds (CH). When I was in my second degree, I realised that I wanted to improve in photography. In 2011, I graduated from ECAL/ University of art and design in Lausanne, obtaining a BA in photography. During my studies I developed a curiosity, sensitivity and a particular focus towards the world around me. For few years now, my research has been focused on African identity through Western eyes.




Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents




Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents

Zulu Kids



Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents




Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents

YaKalaBen



You grew up as the daughter of a Guinean mother and a Swiss father - in what way did your Guinean and
Swiss heritage influenced the way you view the world as a photographer?

I think to be a mix of cultures is a great wealth. I am an African-European, born in Switzerland.
My parents instilled in me both cultures and shared their history as well. When I began at ECAL University of Art and Design, I knew that I wanted to deepen my knowledge about my African heritage and I decided to focus my work on African culture.





Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents

Khoi San




Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents

Marlène




Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents
For WAD magazine nį 53 / Cocktail




For your project Ya Kala Ben, you write that you have studied "ritual artifacts common to the cosmology of Guineans; statuettes
that are part of a ceremonial structureĒ. What drew your interest to these artefacts in the first place? And what is the feeling or impression that you want the pictures that were inspired by them to convey to the viewer?

 All I knew before the trip was that my mother is muslim and that my father is a protestant, although Iíve not been baptized. The religious aspect of my motherís country became very prominent. I discovered an animist side to the Guinean culture which is based on peopleís respect for it. I had been exposed to the supernatural part of Guinea as since I was a child, I visited Ďmaraboutsí (some type of witches) and this time around took part in many ceremonies and rituals. And for me it was important to do this work, because now I feel more aware of this situation, the existence of a parallel world, and the world of spirit.

I selected the elements meticulously for the functions of my picture.  This world is based on rigour, with everything in its place. 
While recontextualizing African elements through my camera, I bring them into a framework for Occidental taste and aesthetic choices.  I try to transform and put a symbol back into Western intention. I am particularly interested in the attribution of religious or mystical qualities to inanimate objects known as fetishes. The myths, the force of nature, and the deep, intuitive, impulsive culture of Africa offered me a lot of creative inspiration. My approach was to separate those sacred statuettes from their religious context in order to immortalize them in a Western framework.






Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents




Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents

The African Queens Ė New York magazine




Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents




Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents

Zulu Kids




 Does taking pictures of people who are not professional models pose specific challenges to you?
I like working with non professional people. They donít try to be fake.





Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents




Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents









Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents

YaKalaBen




What part does fashion play in your life?
While making ĎYa Kala Ben,í I was inspired by African statuettes; but there is another context and another meaning, fashion wise.  I enjoy fashion photography, and sometime I draw on that to make sure the series isnít boring.





Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents




Namsa Leuba-ladiesngents

Zulu Kids




namsaleuba.com



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Chu Teppa_Creator of goddesses-interview  
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Posted on Jul 13 2015
Chu Teppa-ladiesngents-Chu-Teppa

Chu Teppa-ladiesngents-Chu-Teppa



Chu Teppa-ladiesngents-Chu-Teppa

Zaî, Goddess of liberation, mystery of creation and wind.




Chu Teppa-ladiesngents-Chu-Teppa

Hyê, Goddess of the maternity, kindness and antics.




You have said that "It is always easier to create out of love.
For this reason, my universe is defined by creative goddesses, who are on an epic voyage of transformation journeying towards light and abundance.Ē
How did you meet and choose your creative goddesses?

I just start to create them with the inspiration that I have at the moment. They come from a magical place that I keep inside of me.
It all happens spontaneously.
And the gifts that each goddess brings, also arise while I' m creating.






Chu Teppa-ladiesngents-Chu-Teppa
Cîz, Goddess of initiatory journeys, predictions and hope.




Chu Teppa-ladiesngents-Chu-Teppa

celestial goddess




What was the inspiration for your goddesses? Does each one of them stand for a side of you, maybe?
I think that the inspiration goes back to my childhood, to the time that I would play and create a
parallel, phantasy universe. That magical place still lives in me.






Chu Teppa-ladiesngents-Chu-Teppa
Lah', goddess of the secrets, the vanguard and clarity




Chu Teppa-ladiesngents-Chu-Teppa
Lüf, Goddess of skyline, pranks and telepathy.




Do you have your own personal mantras? What are they about?
Do you share their wisdom with the people close to you?

I think it is important for the evolution of human beings to be connected with love, nature and spirituality in any form. That is why it seems to me that it is
important to create mantras which inspire people to connect with them.






Chu Teppa-ladiesngents-Chu-Teppa



Øbå, Goddess of transparency, perseverance and reason




Chu Teppa-ladiesngents-Chu-Teppa
Celebration





Apart from the goddesses, you have also created other pieces like the Mystic, the Gnome, or the Love Party - do they belong to the same artistic universe as the Goddesses?
They come from the same place; they may me different as to their techniques, forms and colours, but they have the same DNA , the same magic, the same perfume.






Chu Teppa-ladiesngents-Chu-Teppa

Koÿ, Goddess of Winter, insight and hugs.




Chu Teppa-ladiesngents-Chu-Teppa
Måû, Goddess of harmony, lucky strike and coincidences.





How important a role does fashion play in your life? Do you care about following it closely or from afar?
I love fashion, it is another way to express ourselves; I'd rather have my own personal style,
something eclectic and romantic. I do not like to dress as if Iíve sprung out of the pages of a magazine; I think itís better to have your own style. It is always more interesting and original.






Chu Teppa-ladiesngents-Chu-Teppa
•ün, Goddess of vanity, second chances and eternal recurrence.



chuteppa.com




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